Elizabeth A.S. Brooke

Crafting, traveling and everything in between.


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Where to shop: Main Street, Abindon, Va.

We went to Abingon, Va., last Saturday to walk the Virginia Creeper Trail. While we were there, we also checked out Main Street and some local businesses.

First off, we ate a quick lunch at the famous Martha Washington Hotel and Spa’s Market Deli (there’s two links: hotel and the deli). This hotel is gorgeously decorated and would be a very pleasant place to stay. I’d love to check out a cabaret and get a massage at the spa.

Chris had a reuben with chips and I had 1/2 a turkey sandwich with Italian Wedding soup and chips. Very delicious.

After the walk, we stopped by A Likely Yarn, a local yarn shop on Pecan Street just below the Creeper’s trail head.

The business is one of the largest, locally-owned stores I’d been in. A knitting class was taking place in a small room to the left as we walked in and several ladies were browsing books and yarn in the large shop area to the right.

There was a large collection of books, a lot separated by category, such as socks, crochet or knitting. There was also a rack that had “Handknit Heros,” a comic book of needle welding crime fighters.

I was very impressed with the large selection of crochet and knitting books at A Likely Yarn.
The yarn selection was pretty nice too. Prices were comparable to other shops I’d been in and there was a wide variety of brands.
I think I just about picked up every skein of yarn along this wall.

I signed up for the shop’s e-newsletters and the lady tending the shop told me about an upcoming retreat in February.

Next we walked around Main Street and stopped in several antique shops, including Abingdon Mercantile and Frames. We were on the hunt for Rookwood Pottery (Chris’ parents collect it) and a dress form (I want one so much!).

We also stopped at The Arts Depot to check out some artists’ studios. I really liked some fabric hats and paintings, such as those by Jackie Dolpp and Joyce Samuel. The artists’ collaborative is a one block off Main Street on Depot Square.

Before heading home, we grabbed coffee at Zazzy’z Coffee House.

While in Abingdon, you should also check out  Barter Theater, A House on Main, The Tavern, and other antique, clothing and gift shops along Main Street.


Where to shop: Making Ends Meet

While in Shelbyville, Ky., I took the opportunity to visit Making Ends Meet, a store that carries home decor fabrics, trims, gift items and more. I’m not really into making home decor items, but I love walking around any fabric store and checking out the fabric colors and textures and notions.
And the employees didn’t seem to care. They welcomed me warmly and allowed me to wander around and feel fabric to my heart’s content!
Making Ends Meet is located in an adorable house on Washington Street, Shelbyville, Ky.
If I were to make a whole bunch of pillows and draperies or was in need of fabulous trims, this is the place I’d want to go. And, dude, they have an online store!
I found the store using the visitor center’s shopping directory posted in the center’s yard. Shops are listed by category and a map shows you what street and building to find them. Very helpful!

Here are some photos I shot inside Making Ends Meet:
I love the colors!

This would make excellent curtains, for windows or the shower.

I love the embroidery on these draperies.

The store has trims galore. I bet you’d never have trouble finding a trim to match your project here.
Across the street was a store called Needle Nest, a cross-stitching and needle point store that also offers framing. I didn’t go inside, but I wanted to let you know about it.

So, if you find yourself in the Shelbyville area, stop by and check out the shops!


Shelbyville, Ky.

On our way to Evansville, Ind., to spend time with Chris’ family, we stopped in Shelbyville, Ky.

I don’t know very much about Shelbyville except that it’s near Kentucky’s capital, Frankfort, and is home to one of our employer’s central offices.

We spent a couple of hours walking around and checking out the historic downtown. We always check out a city’s downtown to gauge how well local businesses are doing and to admire the architecture.

There were a few locally-owned business, including a coffee shop, gift shop, fabric and needlepoint stores, clothing store and, I think, a furniture store.

Here is some of what we saw:

Shelbyville looks very busy for a Thursday afternoon, a couple days before Christmas.

This 1902 building is in great shape. Shelbyville appears to take very good care of its buildings. In fact, there were a couple buildings surrounded by scaffolding, so I assume those were getting a face lift too.

I’m trying to capture the whole feel of this building — from the stained glass windows to the columns and entryway. I don’t think this picture does this building justice.

I really liked this cute building. It sticks out among the brick buildings, but it has character and I’d love to live/work here.

Another shot of the house/office.

The building to the right is the visitor center and museum. The shopping directory is located in the front yard.

I’d love to know more about this historic building. It appears that not only was it a school, but at one time was or is an inn.

Here’s a shot of the inn’s sign. I love how the tree and vines frame the walkway.

This is some sort of jail. I wonder if it’s still used. I doubt it, but there was a cop car parked along the road beside it.

Even if it’s no longer used as a jail, it may still be used as an office, as indicated by this sign.

This is Shelbyville Fountain. You can read info about it in the photo above.

The shopping signs outside the visitor’s center and museum was very helpful. Shops are listed by category and a map shows you want street and building to find them. I think every shopping district should have one.

I’ll write about Making Ends Meet, a shop I visited while we were in Shelbyville, in a few days.


Old Salem Tavern and Edward McKay

Hello! Last weekend was very lovely. Chris, Sidney and I spent time outdoors on some trails and doing some Christmas shopping.

Here’s a quick recap of things we did and places you might enjoy checking out.

Saturday
On Saturday we headed to Winston-Salem, N.C., where we walked around at Historic Bethabara (always a favorite), dined at Old Salem Tavern (loved it!) and bought a mountain of books at Edward McKay (first visit to this Winston store; we usually visit the Greensboro store).

Historic Bethabara
Historic Bethabara is were the Moravians originally settled before moving to Old Salem. We always enjoy walking around the gardens, old buildings and trails.

On this particular day, we finally made it to town while the visitor center/museum was open. We only had 10 mins. to browse around, but at least we got to see it. I really want to go back when we have more time to look at all the exhibits.

Old Salem Tavern
At Old Salem Tavern, which is located in Historic Old Salem, Chris had a steak and I had salmon in a pumpkin and sunflower seed crust.

The waitstaff dresses in period clothes and each table has a candle. I wouldn’t think, looking at the menu and set up, that this would be considered a family-friendly place, but families were there, including a mom with her two grown daughters and a toddler grandson and a family of five with children ages 7 and under who sat in the same room as us.

It’s great the restaurant is so accommodating that families fell free to come. The kids were really well-behaved, so the unique atmosphere and our experience wasn’t ruined by wild kids running around. Definitely grab a bite to eat here when you visit Old Salem!

Edward McKay
Next up — Edward McKay, a used book store with locations in many cities through N.C. I’d already taken Chris to the Greensboro location, where I used to visit when I was a student at UNCG. I had just heard about the Winston location and we went to check it out.

Jackpot! We bought $200+ worth of books for under $70. I so love used book stores! Chris found a lot of books. He said he can never find anything that interests him when we go to big box, new book stores, but this place is a gem.

I left with four text-like books, a knitting book, a color guide used for design and a dog training book. Chris bought a bunch of fiction and some non-fiction.

Sunday
On Sunday we headed up to Christiansburg, Va., to do some Christmas shopping.

There’s not really that many cool places to tell you about, but we stopped at the Bed, Bath and Beyond where we bought some really cool dishes and a Ross Dress for Less (my favorite store!) where to grabbed some bed sheets and shirts. We were able to put a small dent in the gift lift.

On the way to the city, we stopped at Radford to walk on the Riverway Trail, a 3.5 mile, paved trail. It’s a very nice walk through the city’s Bissett and Wildwood parks. We’ve walked it a few times before and some of the trails at Wildwood Park. It’s a pretty neat park system for such a small city.

Bissett Park is a large recreation park with fields and playgrounds. On this day, we walked by several soccer games.

Wildwood Park is a wooded park with dirt paths going up and down the side of hills along a creek. We probably walk the most on this trail. It’s located across the road from Bissett Park, but the Riverway Trail connects both parks by a tunnel under the road.

I wish we had something like that in our town!