Elizabeth A.S. Brooke

Crafting, traveling and everything in between.


Knitting and Crochet HD app

Remember me asking about the Knitting and Crochet iPad app?

Since I now have an iPad, my interest is piqued once again.

I’ve found it in the app store and took a closer look. It has 4 out of 5 stars, so it seems like it’s worth getting. And it’s currently $2.99 instead of $4.99.

But I still don’t know if it’s worth the cost.

Here’s what it has:
– 20 patterns,though it doesn’t say how many are knitting and how many are crochet and you can’t preview all of them before you buy
– fix-it instructions with photos
– Stitch guides and how-tos

At $2.99 I’m tempted to buy it. Twenty patterns and a portable stitch guide sounds like a pretty good deal to me, but if it goes higher or back to $4.99, I don’t know if I’d drop the cash.

It would be great if there was a way to upload patterns to take along too. That along with the stitch guide and fix-it tips would make this a very useful tool. Maybe the developer could hook up with pattern companies or sites, like Interweave Knits, Vogue Knitting or Ravelry. That would be pretty cool.


The Knit and Crochet Show

The Knit and Crochet Show is coming to the Greensboro, N.C., area in September. Will you be there?

I learned about it from Ravelry friend hartroadhomestead. So, I’ve emailed Mom and my sis to see if they want to go to the Greensboro show, which is Sept. 23-25.

There’s also a show in Minneapolis, Minn., in July. Might want to check that one out if it’s closer to you.

The show features vendors of yarns and notions for knitters and crocheters alike.

There’s also classes and several special events, like dinners and fashion shows.

I don’t think we’re going to take in any classes as they’re pretty expensive. But we’re talking about going at least one day to check out some yarn and other events.

Cost is $10 for one day and $5 for each additional day. That cost isn’t too bad. Plus, you can grab a coupon off the event’s website here.

You can register for the event here.

Hope to see you there!


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Kimchi quesadilla, new knitting needles

So, I did it. I made kimchi!

I’ve eaten a lot of it already. Here’s my third kimchi quesadilla. It makes a great, light lunch.

I truly recommend trying out the recipe if you have any cabbage you need to cook up.

Unrelated news:

I’m just about finished with the Tanglewood Pullover sweater I’ve been working on forever. According to Ravelry, I’ve started the project Feb. 27. But I haven’t been knitting since then. I put the needles down for a couple of months.

My sweater is going to be all green. I can’t wait to wear it this fall!

All that’s left to finish is the second sleeve, stitching everything together and knitting up the collar.

While in Cincinnati a couple weekends ago, Chris and I stopped at a yarn store suggested by Chris’ aunt — One More Stitch.

I wanted to pick up a size 5 circular knitting needle for the sweater’s collar and I didn’t have one in my knitting supplies.

This store is HUGE and is filled with a lot of beautiful yarn and needles. If you happen to be out that way, stop by and check them out.
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The Tanglewood Pullover is found in this book: 

For some Korean fare, check out this cookbook:
 


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Hubby’s fingerless mitts

I completed Chris’ fingerless mitts last weekend. They turned out much better than I anticipated. I couldn’t be happier except if I had used wool instead of acrylic yarn. But Chris asked that I use yarn I already had on hand and, so, acrylic it was.

I had considered using Pamela Grossman’s “Knucks” pattern over at Knitty.com. I found it through the Elliphantom Knits blog. They look really cool and I figured Chris would dig ’em. (I planned to leave off the embroidery though. That wouldn’t have been Chris’ style.)

But after printing out the instructions and reviewing them more closely, I passed it over. It just seemed too difficult to tackle. I would have to knit each finger separately and then attach them to the palm part of the glove later. Too much hassle.

I had some fingerless mittens patterns, but they were designed for women’s medium-sized hands and were either lacy or too feminine —”Ladylike Lace Gloves” by MK Carroll in “Stitch ‘N Bitch Crochet: The Happy Hooker” and “Hurry Up Spring Armwarmers” By Renée Rigdon in “Stitch ‘N Bitch: The Knitter’s Handbook.”


So I decided to tackle designing a pattern on my own. I’d already made the crocheted “Ladylike Lace Gloves” for myself and my sister, so I sort of had an idea of how to go about it. Just in case, I studied the techniques for the thumb hole again in both the crocheted pattern and the knitted “Hurry Up Spring Armwarmers” and then began.

I used worsted weight acrylic yarn and four size 7 double pointed knitting needles. My pattern’s below and I’ve posted it on Ravelry. Adjust the needle sizes, yarn and number of cast on stitches to fit for your man’s hands. Chris’ hands, I suppose, are medium-sized man hands.

Hubby’s fingerless mitts
By: E.A. Seagraves
(Credit for the thumb technique goes to Renée Rigdon.)

Materials:
(4) size 7 (4.5 mm) double pointed needles
left over worsted weight yarn (medium weight/4)

Special abbreviations:
pm = place a stitch marker on the needle after the last stitch knitted
sm = slip stitch marker from one needle to the next
M1 = make one stitch, Insert the left needle under the loop between the stitch just knitted and the next. Pull up a loop and knit into it, creating one stitch.

Directions: (medium-sized man hands)

CO 36 stitches, placing 12 stitches on each of three needles. With fourth needle begin knitting:

Row 1-40 (or the length you want): K4, P4 around

Left Hand:
Row 41: (K4, P4) across 2 needles. On Needle 3, K3, place marker (pm), M1, pm, K1, P4, K4

Row 42: (K4, P4) across 2 needles. On Needle 3, K3, slip marker (sm), M1, K1, M1, sm, K1, P4, K4

Rows 43-47: *(K4, P4) across 2 needles. On Needle 3, K3, sm, between markers knit in front and back of the first stitch creating two stitches, knit across until one stitch left between markers, knit in front and back of the last stitch, sm, K1, P4, K4 (Repeat from * around until 13 stitches total between markers.)

Palm: Rows 48-61: Slip 13 stitches onto a stitch holder. Then continue K4, P4 around (minus the 13 stitches) for 14 rows. Bind off and weave in ends.

Thumb: Rows 48-54: Divide 13 stitches evenly on three needles, such as 4 stitches on Needles 1 and 2 and 5 stitches on Needle 3. Knit around 7 times. Bind off and weave in ends, using the yarn tails to sew any holes left around and between the thumb and palm. (I had holes below and above the thumb.)

Right Hand:
Row 41: On Needle 1, K4, P4, K3, pm, M1, pm, K1. On Needles 2 and 3, P4, K4 around.

Row 42: On Needle 1, K4, P4, K3, sm, M1, K1, M1, sm, K1. On Needles 2 and 3, P4, K4 around.

Row 43-47: *On Needle 1, K4, P4, K3, sm, between markers knit in front and back of the first stitch creating two stitches, knit across until one stitch left between markers, knit in front and back of the last stitch, sm, K1. On Needles 2 and 3, P4, K4 across. (Repeat from * around until 13 stitches total between markers.)

Palm: Rows 48-61: Slip 13 stitches onto a stitch holder. Then continue K4, P4 around (minus the 13 stitches) for 14 rows. Bind off and weave in ends.

Thumb: Rows 48-54: Divide 13 stitches evenly on three needles, such as 4 stitches on Needles 1 and 2 and 5 stitches on Needle 3. Knit around 7 times. Bind off and weave in ends, using the yarn tails to sew any holes left around and between the thumb and palm. (I had holes below and above the thumb.)