Elizabeth A.S. Brooke

Crafting, traveling and everything in between.


Summer Squash Saute

I took of some of the squashes I got from our garden the other night (see here) and decided to try out a new recipe.

This is called Summer Squash Saute. It’s from Frances Musser of Newmanstown, Pa., and is a recipe she submitted to “Taste of Home.” I found the recipe in a “Savings Pack,” which is attached to several other recipes Nannie used to create a recipe book for me.

Nannie used twist times to hold recipes from several sources together.
Tada! Instant cookbook.
Here’s the recipe.

Here’s the recipe with photos of the steps below:

Summer Squash Saute

1 bacon strip, diced
1 tbsp. onion, finely chopped
1 tbsp. each of green, red and yellow bell peppers, finely chopped
1 garlic clove, minced
1 medium yellow summer squash, cut into 1/2-inch cubes

1. Cook bacon until crisp over medium heat.
2. Add onions, peppers and garlic and cook until tender.
3. Add the squash, cover and cook until tender (about 5 minutes).

Plate and enjoy!

Here’s what I did:

Add the chopped bacon and cook until crisp.
While the bacon cooks, cut up the veggies: onion, garlic, pepper and squash.
I only used green pepper.

Cook the onion, garlic and pepper until tender.

Add the squash, cover and cook until squash is tender, about 5 minutes.

Ready to eat!


Progress is slow, but at least there’s progress!

Look what I found in the garden this afternoon!

This is the first thing I’ve pulled from the garden this year. We planted the summer crops late because of the rain we had for a month or more. And now it’s so hot, the plants are struggling to hold on.

But this little pea pod gives me hope! I found two more pea pods starting to grow and a couple more blooms on the vine.

So, there’s still hope for the spring crops and I’m cheering on the summer crops. 🙂


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Quick update and other randomness

Hi, folks! Sorry I’ve been M.I.A. for a few weeks. Some things came up (i.e. work, sick grandpa), so I’ve been busy dealing with things other than blogging …. or even crafting!

But I started hitting the needles again earlier this week and I plan to finish those pair of gloves this weekend (Sorry, Chelsey!) I don’t think I’ll get Chris’ cardigan finished by next week, but that’s fine. I got a late start on it anyway and some of the other projects for the 2011 Sweater Challenge will be fairly quick.

I also plan to work some more on my knit top I talked about here, but I’m not promising myself I’ll finish it this weekend. That’s just setting the bar too high since I’ve still got laundry to do, taxes to pay and other things to do that I’ve gotten behind on. I’m starting to pick up the pieces, though, and get things back on track.

Though I haven’t done anything crafty in the past couple weeks, I have made some killer recipes (I’ve gotta eat, yo) and planned out our spring and fall gardens. In fact, we dropped the onion sets into the ground Valentine’s Day weekend.

Next up we’ll start seeds for broccoli and spinach. We can start those inside as early as next weekend.

To plan out the garden, we’re using this book and I love it (thanks, Mom)!

Mom gave it to us for Christmas and I’ve flipped through it many times since December. It gives tips on how to plant seeds and/or plants, when to apply side dressings, how to prevent disease and pests and what are some good companion plants. It’s all organized in a user-friendly layout and easy to read and use. I’m looking forward to referring to it several times this year.

As promised, I’ll snap a few pics of the cardigan and post these on here sometime later this weekend or early next week.


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Photos of scarf, sweater and tomato update

One down, one to go
I finished the first of two scarves last night:

This alpaca yarn feels so good and it’s so pretty. It’s going to be hard to turn this loose for Christmas.

Chris said I should buy some more alpaca yarn and make one for myself.

The pattern uses a traditional ripple pattern that is commonly found in afghans. I think it translates beautifully into scarves.

I can’t wait to see how the other scarf turns out. It’s colors are just as pretty.

Photo update
Here’s the sweater all washed and blocked. It’s no where near as stretched out and frumpy as it was last weekend when I completed it.

I’m pretty pleased with how it turned out. Green is definitely my color.

I’m also glad I didn’t sew the collar shut. I think I like it open. Do you?

Tomatoes galore!
I canned six more quarts of tomatoes this morning! I can’t believe how many tomatoes we’ve gotten this year.

We didn’t tie the plants up, so many have been lost to rot because they sat on the ground too long or we overlooked them as they hid underneath leaves and stems.

We also had a lot of ants, roly polys (pill bugs) and slugs we had to fight tomatoes for.

I’ve canned 2 quarts of tomatoes with chilies, 17 quarts of diced tomatoes, 1 pint of diced tomatoes and 3 pints of salsa. That is a blessing!

That doesn’t include the quart of basil-garlic tomato sauce we made earlier in the summer to can with the peach chutney disaster (had to throw out all 7 pints because it burned and tasted awful; apple cider vinegar does not substitute for white wine vinegar!) and canned peaches (1 quart).


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An American Copper

Chris took a picture of this butterfly in our yard yesterday. It landed on one of our many daisies.

(All photos by Christopher Brooke. Do not use without permission.)

Chris was excited to capture it in a photo because he believes it’s an American Copper, a butterfly he doesn’t have a photo of yet.

His plans to plant as many butterfly-friendly flowers and host plants as possible is really paying off.

I don’t think I shared these photos with you yet, but the yard has also attracted a pair of hummingbirds.

This is the female hummingbird. She’s in the middle of the photo.

This is the male hummingbird. He’s checking out the second flower from the left.

They’ve been visiting the yard, especially the bee balm, for close to 3 weeks now. Chris was happy to see we’ve made a nice home or them too.
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We have both of these books and are useful in identifying birds.


National Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Birds--E: Eastern Region - Revised Edition  National Geographic Field Guide to the Birds of North America, Fifth Edition