Elizabeth A.S. Brooke

Crafting, traveling and everything in between.


Kimchi recipe

Arwen O’Reilly Griffith posted a recipe for kimchi over at Craft Magazine the other day. She said kimchi is a Korean cabbage dish.

I had a small cabbage in the fridge that we got through the CSA. We’re getting ready to head to Cincinnati for Chris’ aunt and uncle’s 50th wedding anniversary party so I had to do something with before it went bad.

I thought the recipe sounded like a good way to use up some cabbage so I gave it a try. Here’s the result:

It’s gotta ferment for a few days before it’s ready. I’ll let you know how it tastes when I try it. Griffith said she eats hers with eggs and a commenter said they eat kimchi on a quesadilla. I like the quesadilla idea and might try that first.
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Interested in learning more about Korean cuisine? Try these cookbooks out:

    


Garden bounty no more

Chris and I planted two types of tomatoes (12 plants in all), green pepper, cayenne pepper, cabbage, cantaloupe, basil and oregano in our garden this year.

Everything has been taking off and looking wonderful. There were several dozen little green tomatoes and I couldn’t wait until they ripened.

But, unfortunately, in one night deer ate every single on of the tomato plants, little tomatoes and green peppers. This was in despite of the fishing line strung with plastic bags that was supposed to scare the hoofed nuisances away from our 8′ by 8′ garden.

Man, I was looking forward to tomato sandwiches, homemade salsa and pasta sauce!

Luckily, we still have three green pepper plants we placed in pots inside. So we should still get some peppers.

For next year, Chris and I are planning fences that, hopefully, will be deer resistant. It’s gonna have to be tall enough so the deer can’t jump over it or reach over.


Although we’ve had some setbacks with the veggie garden, most of our other plants are doing fine, including this gladiola (left) and these purple cone flowers (right), shown here growing among Maximilian sunflowers.