Elizabeth A.S. Brooke

Crafting, traveling and everything in between.


Easter Wildflower Hike 2015

Though Sydney has had a sore knee for the past several weeks, we managed to go on our annual Easter wildflower walk last week. Since she’s still having trouble walking, we choose a short, easy trail — Rock Run Loop — at Bernheim Arboretum & Research Forest. The 0.5-mile trail is located in Bernheim’s forest and follows along a small creek.

We didn’t see many flowers, but we did see a trout lily, which we didn’t see that often in Virginia. Below are the flowers:

Cutleaf Toothwort

Cutleaf toothwort

Rue anemone

Rue anemone

Trout lily

Trout lily

This weekend we wanted to see if we could find any wildflowers at Iroquois Park. We were pleasantly surprised. Below is some of what we found, including Jack-in-the-pulpit, which we’ve never seen before.

Bloodroot

Bloodroot

Mayapples

Mayapples

Jack-in-the-pulpit

Jack-in-the-pulpit

Spring beauties

Spring beauties

Young Jewelweed (Touch-me-nots)

Young jewelweed (Touch-me-nots)

We miss seeing the Dutchman’s breeches, wild columbine and showy orchis we could easily find in Virginia, but we’re looking forward to seeing what other new flowers we can discover in our new community.


White Glove Test Exhibit, Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft

Before the winter weather arrived Monday, Chris and I visited the newly opened White Glove Test exhibit at the Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft.

White Glove Test photo 1

It’s a small exhibit of punk band fliers created and distributed during 1978 to 1994. I thought Chris would enjoy looking for fliers of shows he may have attended.

White Glove Test photo 5

He only found one — Big Black. But since most of the fliers don’t include years, he’s not entirely sure. There were several fliers of bands he recognized, like favorite Hüsker Dü.

I really liked the fliers created on notebook paper, like these:

White Glove Test 2

Here’s another favorite:

White Glove Test 3

Though a small collection, the exhibit is worth checking out. It’s open through April 6.


Loop Island Wetlands, New Albany, Ind.

A professor recently told me about walking a section of the Ohio River Greenway that runs alongside Loop Island Wetlands in New Albany, Ind. Chris, Sidney and I went to check it out over the weekend.

Loop Island Wetlands

As described by my professor, the parking area is a little scary. It’s located at an old tannery. Several abandoned buildings and trailers sit at the entrance. My professor told me when he visited, he moved his car because it seemed like a place riffraff would most likely hang out.

Loop Island Wetlands parking lot

I understand what he means. All of the buildings had broken or boarded-up windows. Graffiti covered the walls of the buildings and along the trail. Based on the juvenile content, I’m sure the “artists” were teens.

We would not have been sure of our location if it weren’t for cars full of people parking and heading for the trailhead. Other clues we were in the correct place was a project development sign at the gravel lot’s entrance and parking signs posted on one of the dilapidated buildings.

We attempted to walk some dirt paths through the woods next to the wetlands, but our walk was cut short due to a minor breach in what appeared to be a man-made pond. If there was a path, it was washed out by a newly created rill.

Instead, we headed back to the paved greenway. It wound north of the wetlands and climbed a levee. Just west of the wetlands, we found an apartment community sitting below the levee. A couple played fetch with their German shepherd and other medium-sized dog. On the greenway, we walked past several teenagers, families, couples with dogs and a couple of joggers.

At the end of the greenway, we found a paved parking lot. According to the greenway’s map, that section is 0.8 miles. Eventually this section will connect to the portion we walked on when we visited the Falls of the Ohio.

Though not a relaxing walk, Loop Island Wetlands was an interesting visit.


Happy New Year!

I hope you enjoyed time with family and friends during this holiday season. I’m currently on the tail end of a 2-week break, which I’ve enjoyed immensely. Next week starts another round of rigorous studying.

We spent some time in N.C. and Va. visiting with family and friends. It was so wonderful seeing so many loved ones! I was tempted to kidnap a few people and bring them back to Kentucky. We finished up the holidays with a family Christmas dinner this past Sunday. Sunday’s celebrations ended with a visit to Lights Under Louisville — a Christmas light display in Louisville Mega Cavern.

Lights Under Louisville 2

Lights Under Louisville 1

I wish you a blessed, prosperous and happy new year in 2015!


Falls of the Ohio, Clarksville, Ind.

On a recent Saturday we took a short trip across the Ohio River to Falls of the Ohio State Park. This small, state park features a fossil bed on the shoreline of the Ohio. The visitor and interpretive center sits on a cliff overlooking the Ohio and the fossil bed, which you can reach via a long set of steps and climbing down over some big rocks.

Falls of the Ohio

Some of the fossil beds aren’t visible year round due to water levels, though late summer and early fall are good opportunities to see them. There were pools of water in various spots along the fossil bed when we visited. Every once in awhile we found a minnow trapped in a small pool.

Pools of water are common along the fossil beds at the Falls of the Ohio.

Pools of water are common along the fossil beds at the Falls of the Ohio.

Chris and Sidney check out the pools of water at the Falls of the Ohio

Chris and Sidney check out the pools of water at the Falls of the Ohio

We spent half an hour looking for fossils embedded in the rock. An interpretive sign said the fossils include many different types of coral, trilobites and brachiopods. Here’s some photos:

Falls fossil 1

Falls fossil 2

Falls fossil 3

The visitor center had signs posted warning visitors that the temperature on the rocks could be as much as 20-25 degrees warmer. I can believe it. We were only on the rocks for about 10 mins. before I broke out in a sweat on what was a relatively cool, summer morning. Make sure you take water if you visit on a really hot day!

The park has events throughout the year. You can also pack at picnicking, fish or hike. I just discovered the park has one trail. I wish we’d found it while we were there. We did walk a little ways on the Ohio River Greenway.

The park is open year round, except for a few holidays, and is located near I-65 in Indiana.


Butchertown Art Fair and Waterfront Park

Though the iPhone was a failure at the Americana World Festival, it was somewhat serviceable at the Butchertown Art Fair and Waterfront Park. We visited both on a Sunday a couple weekends ago.

My in-laws told us that the the art fair is usually small. That doesn’t speak, however, to the quality of the products. I thought many of the artisans had nice items.

Butchertown Art Fair

Butchertown Art Fair

I really enjoyed the architecture and tree-lined streets in the community, too. Excuse the recycling bin. It doesn’t really make for  a great photo.

Butchertown

Butchertown

We spent some time speaking with some ladies from Preservation Louisville. Some of the organization’s efforts include preserving the city’s shotgun houses.

One of the women recommended hooking up with a couple of neighborhood associations close to our home. I’ve looked them up and am currently keeping tabs on the groups’ Facebook pages. The associations don’t necessarily serve our immediate neighborhood, but we’re all pretty much in the same area. Many of the similar issues affect us equally, such as vandalism at local businesses, plans for the Taylor Boulevard and New Cut Road corridor and activities at Iroquois Park.

After leaving Butchertown, we decided to take a stroll at Waterfront Park. While walking along the river front we saw the Belle of Louisville.

Belle of Louisville

Belle of Louisville

It was threatening rain, so not many folks were out and about and we decided not to stray too far from our car.


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Americana World Festival

We spent a few hours on a recent Saturday morning watching some acts at the 24th Americana World Festival, hosted by the Americana Community Center.

There was, of course, dancing:

Traditional Hawaiian dancing

Traditional Hawaiian dancing

Appalatin had a large group up and dancing by the end of its set.

Appalatin had a large group up and dancing by the end of its set.

An Iroquois High School student dances during the Americana World Festival.

An Iroquois High School student dances during the Americana World Festival.

Several Iroquois High School students participated in the Americana World Festival.

Several Iroquois High School students participated in the Americana World Festival.

There was also music, food and vendors. I recorded two performances, but my iPhone didn’t pick up any audio. I’m researching ways to correct this, but it seems that those videos are a loss. That sucks because I really wanted you to hear some Appalatin and watch one of the the high school students’ dances.

The photo quality wasn’t all that great either. I’m pretty disappointed at the overall visual quality. Next time I’ll know to at least take my point-and-shoot if not my D50.

I had a blast, though, and I can’t wait for next year’s event.

The community center offers a wide variety of services —from family education and after school programs to art and a community gardens.